What We Offer

The Alternative Learning Center offers both a day and night program for high school students:

The day program serves high school students who seek a diploma but prefer a less traditional approach to instruction and learning. The program follows the district calendar and meetings during the day, Monday–Friday. Students must complete a registration process before attending classes.

Students in the night program meet one hour twice per week. This program is designed for high school students who need to make up credits and/or students who prefer a late afternoon (either 3:30 or 4:30 pm) option. Students must be 16 years old to participate in this independent study program and referred by their high school counselor.

The Woodland Program is a special education program that serves students with emotional needs. The program meets during the day, Monday-Friday.

The Journey Transition Program is designed for students with unique needs and abilities who are between the ages of 18-21. This program serves as a conduit to adult services with an emphasis on independent living and vocational skill development.

Adult Transition offers academic programming with a vocational focus for students ages 18-21. Students must meet specific goals on their Individual Education Plan in order to graduate. The goals focuses on five areas of transition: post secondary education and training; employment; community participation; recreation and leisure; and home living. This program helps students with the transition following high school, providing linkages to resources as needed.

Targeted Services for Grades 1–8 are after-school programs to enhance math and reading for elementary and middle grades students. The activities focus on academics, personal development and socialization.

Centennial Adult Continuing Education (ACE) is housed at CALC and provides adult basic education, GED preparation and more, and is part of Centennial Community Education.

American Indian Education for Grades K-12 assists Native American students in attaining academic success, provides Native American students with information about Indian culture and heritage taught by Native American staff, promotes cultural diversity by building bridges between community, staff, parents, and students.