Science

Science Department Staff


Science

Credit

Course #

Course Title

Prerequisites and Notes

1

8353 / 8354

Physical Science 1 and 2

 

1

5353 / 5354

Honors Chemistry 9 and

Honors Physics 9

Student must meet required criteria for enrollment.  Please see course description and Academic Enrichment Opportunities section for more details.

1

8355 / 8356

Biology 1 and 2

 

.5

5380

Honors Zoology

Biology 1 and 2 or AP Biology.  This course offers an optional field trip requiring participating students to pay associated fees.

.5

8357

Earth Science

Physical Science 9 requirements (i.e. 8353 and 8354 or 5353 and 5354).

.5

8358

Aquatic Studies

Biology 1 and 2 or AP Biology.  This course offers an optional field trip requiring participating students to pay associated fees.

.5

8360

Minnesota Outdoor Connections

Optional fee-based projects may be offered to students. 

.5

8359

Anatomy and Physiology

Biology 1 and 2 or AP Biology

.5

8361

Chemistry 1

Physical Science 1 & 2 or Honors Physics 9 and Intermediate Algebra 2 or concurrent enrollment

.5

8362

Chemistry 2

Chemistry 1 or Honors Physics 9 and Intermediate Algebra 2 or concurrent enrollment

1

8365 / 8366

Chemistry Concepts 1 and 2

Physical Science 1 and 2 or Honors Chemistry 9 and Honors Physics 9 and Intermediate Algebra 2 or concurrent enrollment.  This course does not meet NCAA core course requirements and may not meet four year college entrance requirements.

.5

8363

Physics 1

Physical Science 1 and 2 or Honors Physics 9 and Intermediate Algebra 2 or concurrent enrollment.

.5

8364

Physics 2

Physics 1 or Honors Physics 9 and Intermediate Algebra 2 or concurrent enrollment.

1

8367 / 8368

Physics Concepts 1 and 2

Physical Science 1 and 2 or Honors Physics 9 and Intermediate Algebra 2 or concurrent enrollment.  This course does not meet NCAA core course requirements and may not meet four year college entrance requirements.

.5

8369

Physical Science – Astronomy

Physical Science 9 requirements (i.e. 8353 and 8354 or 5353 and 5354).

1

5346 / 5347

AP Biology 1 and 2

Honors Chemistry 9 and Honors Physics 9 or Chemistry 1.

1

5373 / 5374

AP Chemistry 1 and 2

Completion of Honors Geometry 2 or Advanced Algebra 2.  Advanced math skills are required.  See course description and AP and CIS Expectations section for more details.  This course may have associated fees.  Advanced math skills required.

1

5367 / 5368

Introductory College Physics 1 and 2

Must have a “B” or better in Advanced Algebra 2.  The University of Minnesota requires that students taking this course rank in the top 20% of their class.  Please see “Academic Enrichment Opportunities” and “AP and CIS Expectations” sections for details. 

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 1

This course will introduce students to basic chemistry concepts. The focus of student learning will be on matter and energy from an atomic viewpoint.  Students will participate in lab activities and experiments that will increase their understanding of the structure and behavior of matter.  The organization of the periodic table, chemical reactions, nuclear reactions and the internal structure and processes that power the sun and earth.  Students will develop science inquiry skills by designing, performing and analyzing experiments.

 

Students in this course will:

  • Understand the historical models of the atom and the process by which these models are constructed.
  • Learn the basic structure of atoms such as:  protons, electrons, neutrons, isotopes, ions.
  • Study how the periodic table is organized and is used to predict atomic structure and chemical properties.
  • Learn how to write chemical formulas and balanced chemical equations.
  • Apply the Conservation of Mass Law to describing chemical reactions.
  • Understand what determines if a chemical reaction is exothermic or endothermic.
  • Compare fission and fusion nuclear reactions in terms of products, reactants and energy.
  • Investigate the internal structure and processes of the sun and earth.
  • Demonstrate competency in the process of experimental design and the nature of science by doing labs, student inquiries and experiments.

 


 PHYSICAL SCIENCE 2

 This course will introduce students to basic physics concepts.  The focus of student learning will be on the interaction of matter and energy.  Students will gain a basic understanding of the interaction of forces, motion, gravity, energy, work, waves, light and electricity.  Apply this understanding to Earth Science topics like plate tectonics, the creation of solar systems and planets.  Students will participate in:  designing and performing experiments, science inquiry and the application of science and technology to solve problems.

 

Students in this course will:

  • Describe and analyze types of motion and forces on various objects using mathematical models.
  • Identify Newton’s Laws of Motion and use them to explain the motion of every day events.
  • Identify various forms of energy and their transformation in every day events.
  • Describe how the Law of Conservation of Energy governs the efficiency of energy transformations.
  • Define and analyze the relationships between energy, frequency, wavelength, and velocity of wave and apply this knowledge to describing and explaining sound and light phenomena.
  • Describe and explain what electric current is in terms of how it is produced, stored and transmitted.

Honors Chemistry 9 and Honors Physics 9 must be taken as a pair.  Students should register for both to replace Physical Science 1 and 2.
Prerequisite:  Student must meet required criteria for enrollment.  Please see “Academic Enrichment Opportunities” section for more honors course details.

These rigorous courses are designed to challenge the needs of highly motivated and capable students in the subject area of science.  Successful students will be those who are ambitious, responsible, and diligent in completing homework and meet the following criteria:

  • 85% or higher on the math portion of the 8th grade Math MAP test or 7th grade Math MCA or EXPLORE math and science portions.
  • Has a grade average of one of the following:

                -     B- or higher in 8th grade Intermediate Algebra

                -     A- or higher in 8th grade Algebra

 


 HONORS CHEMISTRY 9

This course may be taken in place of Physical Science 1.

Students in this course will:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in writing and naming chemical formulas of inorganic compounds.
  • Relate error in scientific experiments and explanations.
  • Predict the amount of solute in a solution.
  • Make predictions about what products will form in a chemical reaction.
  • Synthesize and analyze scientific experiments.
  • Apply the Kinetic Theory of Matter to describe the various states of matter.
  • Analyze the arrangement of the periodic table and describe how it can be used to predict properties of elements.
  • Analyze evidence for atomic theory and describe current atomic model.
  • Justify the Law of Conservation of Mass as it relates to balanced chemical equations.
  • Convert substances to moles, to mass, to number of particles.
  • Apply laboratory skills towards the separation and identification of compounds.
  • Describe the attractions and forces between two molecules.

 


 HONORS PHYSICS 9

This course may be taken in place of Physical Science 2.

 

Students in this course will:

  • Analyze the forces acting on an object in various situations and the resulting motion.
  • Evaluate the energy transformation in physical systems.
  • Investigate conservation laws as applied to energy and matter.
  • Analyze motion changes and calculate velocities and accelerations.
  • Participate in laboratory experiments and analyzation of experimental results.

 


BIOLOGY 1

Biology 1 is a laboratory science course that will introduce students to basic cellular biology.  The focus of the course will be on different types of cells and how they utilize available energy (photosynthesis and respiration) to maintain homeostasis and reproduce.  Students will investigate:

  • Different types of cells and how cell structure relates to the function of the cell.
  • How genetic information found in DNA provides information for assembling proteins, which dictate the expression of traits in an individual.
  • How cells respond to internal and external environment changes to maintain homeostasis.
  • How mutations in genes can result in uncontrolled cell division called cancer, and how the environment might influence those mutations.
  • How the immune system is a response to fighting off viral and bacterial invaders as well as how vaccines assist in this process.

 


 BIOLOGY 2

The earth is a dynamic planet that is constantly changing. Biology 2 is a laboratory science course that will focus on the forces behind those changes as well as introduce the interactions of living and non-living components of our planet and how each entity affects the others.  Students will investigate:

  • Natural selection as the mechanism used to explain the history and diversity of life on Earth.
  • How variation within species is the result of new inheritable traits occurring from new combinations of existing genes. 
  • The interrelationships and interdependence of organisms producing dynamic biological communities in ecosystems.
  • The processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration as they relate to the energy flow in ecosystems.
  • How matter and energy is transformed and transferred among organisms in an ecosystem.
  • The impact of human interactions/activity on living organisms and ecosystems.

 


 HONORS ZOOLOGY

[This course offers an optional field trip requiring participating students to pay associated fees.]

Zoology will investigate the diversity of the animal kingdom by studying the morphology of each phyla, and using comparative anatomy and dissection to above understand the similarities and uniqueness of those phyla.  Both an ecological and evolutionary perspective will be used to help understand how animals function and why animals are united with other forms of life.

Students in this course will:

  • Identify and describe major characteristics common to species within each animal phyla (group).
  • Understand how similarities (and variations) are used in the classification of species.
  • Understand how scientists use similarities among species to construct phylogenetic trees.
  • Describe adaptations in terms of their benefit to organism survival (natural selection).
  • Identify and explain reasons for geographical distribution of species.
  • Describe factors that influence animal behavior and how those behaviors aid in species survival.
  • Understand the idea of “scaling” and how it relates to the structures and functions of organs and systems.

 


 EARTH SCIENCE

[This course may offer an optional field trip requiring participating students to pay associated fees.]

How do geologic forces shape our planet and our lives? 

Students in this course will:

  • Explore how our planet’s weather system works.
  • Explore our planet’s geologic story with an emphasis on plate tectonics and the geology of the United States.
  • Investigate catastrophes that have affected our planet:

-    Impact Events, Mass Extinctions, supervolcanoes and the Great Dying.

  • Investigate past, present and future changes to the Earth.
  • Investigate extremes of weather:

-     Hurricanes, killer tornadoes, space weather and more.

  • Investigate natural disasters and their human and economic impact upon modern society.
  • Study the foundations of Geologic Science.
  • Study the geologic story of north America, the United States and Minnesota.

This course has the possibility of a field trip to explore Minnesota’s Precambrian rift and post glacial landscape.


AQUATIC STUDIES

[This course offers an optional field trip requiring participating students to pay associated fees.]

Minnesota is fortunate to have a wide variety of fresh water aquatic habitats.  This class will investigate the origins and characteristics of these habitats, study some of the organisms that live in these habitats, and investigate some of factors that can impact an aquatic ecosystem.  This class will have some out of pocket expenses for a field trip behind the scenes to Sea Life Exhibit at the Mall of America and for the purchase of fish for an in-class aquarium project.

Students in this course will:

  • Survey fish populations with emphasis on Minnesota species.
  • Conduct internal and external anatomical identifications of selected fish species.
  • Survey the historical geology in relation to stream and lake formation in Minnesota.
  • Understand water quality parameters.
  • Determine the pollutants in an aquatic ecosystem.
  • Sample local streams and lakes with emphasis on the flora and fauna contained in them.  [Dependent on outside conditions.]

 


 MINNESOTA OUTDOOR CONNECTIONS

Minnesota Outdoor Connection will promote the development of self-esteem, leadership and team building skills. Outdoor topics include:

  • Ecology
  • Minnesota Natural History
  • Outdoor survival skills
  • Minnesota recreation
  • Navigation and orienteering

Building projects include:

  • Rod building
  • Fur sewing
  • Survival bracelet
  • Flint knapping

Students should be prepared to attend class indoors and outdoors in all weather conditions.


ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the structure and function of the human body.  It will survey information students would be required to know as they prepare for college level anatomy and physiology courses.

Students in this course will:

  • Acquire and refine dissection skills by completing a rat, fetal pig, or cat dissection.
  • Describe the primary functions of cells and tissues within organs and organ systems.
  • Locate and describe the major organ systems of the human body.
  • Relate human physiology to human health.

 


 CHEMISTRY 1

This course will highlight the concepts of the atom, the periodic table and the mole.  Students in this course will:

  • Distinguish among atoms, elements, compounds, and molecules.
  • Predict chemical properties based on atomic structure/theory.
  • Use the kinetic molecular theory to describe states of matter.
  • Make predictions about the atom and its bonding capabilities based upon the atomic theory of matter.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in naming chemical compounds and writing the proper formula to represent these compounds.
  • Demonstrate molar mass from a chemical formula and convert substances to moles and number of particles.
  • Relate error in scientific experiments and explanations.
  • Justify the law of conservation of mass as it relates to balanced chemical equations.
  • Analyze the arrangement of the periodic table and describe how it can be used to predict element properties.

 


 CHEMISTRY 2

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 1.  This course will highlight chemical reactions, solutions and energy in chemical reactions.  

Students in this course will:

  • Identify properties of acids and bases and perform titrations based on pH.
  • Correctly differentiate between the different types of reactions and make predictions as to the products of these reactions.
  • Apply the mole to determine amounts of other compounds in a chemical reaction.
  • Apply the laws of thermodynamics to determine the amount of energy in various systems.
  • Predict the amount of solute in a solution.
  • Build upon the theories and concepts from Chemistry 1.

 


 CHEMISTRY CONCEPTS 1

Note:  This sequence does not meet NCAA core course requirements and may not meet four year college entrance requirements.

This course is an introduction into the basic principles of chemistry including the periodic table, bonding, molecular structure, and the mole.  By the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Explore and describe the world in terms of matters, atoms, molecules, and compounds.
  • Perform hands on and computer based chemistry experiments while taking accurate scientific measurements.
  • Decipher trends of elements to help explain their chemical and physical properties.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in scientific and chemical terms and in naming and writing chemical compounds.

 


 CHEMISTRY CONCEPTS 2

Note:  This sequence does not meet NCAA core course requirements and may not meet four year college entrance requirements. 

This course is a continuation of the basic principles of chemistry including solutions, acids and bases, stoichiometry, and reactions.  Students in this course will be able to:

  • Determine chemical formulas.
  • Describe various solutions.
  • Write and predict reactions.
  • Determine relationships between reactants and products.

 


 PHYSICS 1

Students in this course will:

  • Distinguish among matter, energy, force and motion.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in relating the components of motion of an object to an understanding of how the object moves.
  • Recognize the function of forces in producing and affecting the motion of various objects.
  • Discuss the roles that momentum, work and energy serve in the description of the physical world.
  • Participate in laboratory experiments and analyzation of experimental results.

 


 PHYSICS 2

Students in this course will:

  • Distinguish among sound waves, light waves, and all other types of electromagnetic waves.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the production of light waves and their various properties.
  • Relate the characteristics of any wave (wavelength, frequency, velocity) to the motion and behavior of these waves.
  • Summarize the observed forces between charged objects.
  • Distinguish between series and parallel circuits and demonstrate their relationship to Ohm’s Law and power.
  • Participate in laboratory experiments and analyzation of experimental results.

 


 PHYSICS CONCEPTS 1

 

Students in this course will:

  • Use forces and inertia to determine the motion of objects.
  • Describe how when objects change their motion or interact with other objects in the absence of frictional forces, the total amount of mechanical energy remains constant.
  • Describe different types of motion.
  • Understand how forces cause changes.
  • Use scientific methods to investigate and describe the natural world.
  • Understand that there are different forms of energy and describe how energy flows through a system.
     

 PHYSICS CONCEPTS 2

Note:  This sequence does not meet NCAA core course requirements and may not meet four year college entrance requirements. 

This course will highlight the concepts of matter, sound, electricity, magnetism, and light.

Students in this course will:

  • Describe how sound waves are generated from mechanical oscillations of objects and travel through a medium.
  • Describe how electrons respond to electric fields and voltages by moving through electrical circuits and this motion generates magnetic fields.
  • Describe how magnetic and electric fields interact to produce electromagnetic waves.
  • Describe how heat energy is transferred between objects or regions that are at different temperatures by the processes of convection, conduction and radiation.
  • Use scientific method to describe the natural world.
  • Understand how sound is generated and how it travels.
  • Understand electrical forces and how electricity flows in a circuit.
  • Describe how magnetic and electric fields produce light.

 


 PHYSICAL SCIENCE - ASTRONOMY

Students in this course will:

  • Gain an understanding of how the history of astronomy has shaped the current theories and laws of modern astronomy.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a broad overview of topics in astronomy -- from the Earth and moon topics to stars, galaxies and the universe.
  • Relate the principles of rocketry to the construction and launch of a model rocket and space flight and exploration.
  • Recognize and be able to locate a wide variety of stars and constellations visible to observers in Minnesota.
  • Participate in actual observations of the sun, stars and other astronomical objects.

 


¨ADVANCED PLACEMENT OFFERINGS ¨

   

AP BIOLOGY SEQUENCE
 

AP BIOLOGY

This course may be taken in place of Biology 1 and 2.

 The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year.  AP Biology will include those topics regularly covered in a college biology course for majors.  The college course in biology differs significantly from the usual first high school course in biology with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the type of laboratory work done by students, and the time and effort required of students.  The textbooks used for AP Biology should be those used by college biology majors.  The kinds of labs done by AP students must be the equivalent of those done by college students.  To be eligible to earn advanced placement college credit, students must earn a qualifying score on the advanced placement biology test after completing semesters 1 and 2 of AP Biology.  The awarding of college credit is at the discretion of the college or university.

 


AP BIOLOGY 1

Students in this course will cover:

  • Evolutionary Biology - using Natural Selection to explain the history and diversity of life on earth.
  • Ecology - a study of the interactions living organisms have within ecosystems that includes:  energy production, energy transfer, and nutrient cycling.
  • Chemistry of Life – what are the biological molecules associated with living and what role do each play?
  • Cell Structure/Function – a look at the different types of cells and their structure and function as they relate to both individual organisms as well as their role within larger systems.

 


 AP BIOLOGY 2

Students in this course will cover:

  • Cell Energetics – a study of how cells utilize free energy for the purpose of homeostasis.  Topics include:  Cell respiration, Photosynthesis, Fermentation
  • Heredity – how does the information molecule known as DNA get passed on from generation to generation through reproduction?
  • Molecular Genetics – a detailed study of the Central Dogma in Biology; explaining how DNA becomes the traits organisms possess.
  • Biotechnology – the manipulation of genes for the purpose of producing practical solutions to problems in agriculture, medicine, and industry.
  • Homeostasis – Focus on Nervous, Endocrine and Immune Systems and how they help organisms maintain homeostasis.

 


 AP CHEMISTRY SEQUENCE

The AP Chemistry classes are recommended for serious students who have an interest in the biological sciences, physical sciences, or engineering.  To be eligible to earn advanced placement college credit, students must earn a qualifying score on the advanced placement chemistry test after completing semesters 1 and 2 of AP Chemistry.  The awarding of college credit is at the discretion of the college or university.



AP CHEMISTRY 1

Students in this course will learn:

  • Chemical foundations
  • Metrics, scientific notation, and significant figures
  • Classification of matter
  • Atoms, molecules, and ions
  • Formulas, balancing, and stoichiometry
  • Reactions in solutions
  • Gases and gas laws
  • Thermochemistry
  • Atomic structure and periodicity
  • General concepts in bonding

 


 AP CHEMISTRY 2

Students in this course will learn:

  • Properties of solutions
  • Chemical kinetics
  • Chemical equilibrium
  • Acids and bases
  • Solids and liquids
  • Aqueous equilibrium
  • Entropy
  • Electrochemistry
  • Nuclear Chemistry
  • Extended Post test lab work

 


 ¨ COLLEGE COURSE OFFERINGS AND PREREQUISITES ¨

The science classes that are offered for college credit are:

  • Introductory College Physics 1 & 2 (University of Minnesota)
    INTRODUCTORY COLLEGE PHYSICS SEQUENCE

 The student completing Introductory College Physics 1 will receive 4 college credits in physics, equivalent to Introductory College Physics 1 PHYS 1101W at the University of Minnesota.

 

INTRODUCTORY COLLEGE PHYSICS 1

Students in this course will:

  • Summarize the relationship between matter, energy, force and motion.
  • Demonstrate the ability to relate, mathematically, the individual components of motion to the overall understanding of how an object moves.
  • Recognize and apply the function of forces in producing and affecting the motion of various objects.
  • Participate in laboratory experiments and analyzation of experimental results.

 


 INTRODUCTORY COLLEGE PHYSICS 2

Students in this course will:

  • Summarize the observed forces between charged objects.
  • Understand electric and magnetic fields and how they affect other objects both independently and together.
  • Design, draw, and operate electric circuits, both series and parallel, and show their relationship to Ohm’s Law and power.
  • Explain the production and transmission of electrical energy and understand how that relates to common electrical devices.
  • Discuss and solve problems related to Huygen’s Principal and Einstein’s Postulates of Relativity.
  • Summarize the concepts of and solve problems related to electromagnetic waves, wave optics, and optical devices.
  • Participate in laboratory experiments and analyzation of experimental results.