Social Studies

social studies students

Social Studies

Credit

Course #

Course Title

Prerequisites and Notes

.5

8202

Human Geography

 

1

8230 / 8231

World History 1 and 2

 

1

8205 / 8206

United States History 1 and 2

 

.5

8211

Religions of the World

This course may have associated fees related to a field trip.

.5

8213

Current Issues

 

.5

8207

Economics and Political Science

 

.5

8210

Government and Citizenship

 

.5

8208

Psychology

 

.5

8209

Sociology

 

.5

5202

AP Human Geography Split

May replace Human Geography. 

This is a full year course alternating days with Physical Education 9 Split.  Students must register for both courses.  Students must meet required criteria for enrollment.  Please see “Academic Enrichment Opportunities” and “AP and CIS Expectations” sections for details. This course may have associated fees.

1

5230 / 5231

AP World History Sequence

May replace World History 1 and 2.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or permission from instructor to register for this course.  Please see “Academic Enrichment Opportunities” and “AP and CIS Expectations” sections for details. This course may have associated fees.

1

5222 / 5223

AP United States History Sequence

May replace United States History 1 and 2.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or permission from instructor to register for this course.  Please see “Academic Enrichment Opportunities” and “AP and CIS Expectations” sections for details. This course may have associated fees.

.5

5225

AP Microeconomics

May replace 8207 Economics and Political Science.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or permission from instructor to register for this course.  Please see “Academic Enrichment Opportunities” and “AP and CIS Expectations” sections for details. This course may have associated fees.

1

5228/5229

AP Micro/Macro Economics

This is a full year course which may replace 8207 Economics and Political Science.  AP Macroeconomics is only offered in this combination full-year course.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or permission from instructor to register for this course.  Please see "Academic Enrichment Opportunities" and "AP and CIS Expectations" sections for details.  This course may have associated fees.

.5

5224

AP Psychology

 Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or permission from instructor to register for this course.  Please see "Academic Enrichment Opportunities" and "AP and CIS Expectations" sections for details.

.5

5227

College American Democracy in a Changing World

May replace Government and Citizenship.  The University of Minnesota requires that students taking this course rank in the top 20% of their class.  Please see “Academic Enrichment Opportunities” and “AP and CIS Expectations” sections for details.

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

 Using a thematic approach, students in this course will:

  • Identify the distribution and migration patterns of human population on the earth.
  • Explain the concept of culture and determine the factors of cultural settlements throughout the world.
  • Analyze the spatial organization of the earth into political units.
  • Compare the economic activity of developed and developing countries.
  • Describe how humans influence the earth and in turn are influenced by it.
  • Utilize tools of geographers to answer geographic questions.

 

 WORLD HISTORY 1

 Covering the period from 100,000 BCE to 1450 CE, and the following themes:

  • Interaction between humans and the environment.
  • Development and interaction of cultures.
  • State-building, expansion, and conflict.
  • Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems.
  • Development and transformation of social structures.

Students will:

  • Construct and evaluate arguments, using evidence to make plausible arguments.
  • Use documents and other primary data; developing the skills necessary to analyze point of view.
  • Assess continuity and change over time and over different world regions.
  • Explore diversity of interpretations through analysis of primary source documents.

 


WORLD HISTORY 2

 Covering the period from 1450 CE to the present, and the following themes:

  • Interaction between humans and the environment.
  • Development and interaction of cultures.
  • State-building, expansion, and conflict.
  • Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems.
  • Development and transformation of social structures.

Students will:

  • Construct and evaluate arguments, using evidence to make plausible arguments.
  • Use documents and other primary data; developing the skills necessary to analyze point of view.
  • Assess continuity and change over time and over different world regions.
  • Explore diversity of interpretations through analysis of primary source documents.

 


 UNITED STATES HISTORY 1

United States History 1 begins with a review of early US History and emphasizes the time period of 1900-1945.

Students in this course will:

  • Summarize economic development.
  • Examine national/international conflicts.
  • Analyze cultural developments.
  • Define key sociological aspects.
  • Determine political implications.
  • Identify the implications of geographical influences.

 


UNITED STATES HISTORY 2

 

United States History 2 deals with the time period of 1945 to the present and focuses on the same learner outcomes as United States History 1.

 


 RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD

 

[This course may have associated fees related to a field trip.]

Prerequisite:  Although there is no prerequisite for this course, it is expected that the students come with a willingness to learn, ask questions, and discuss about beliefs they may have very little knowledge about.

 

The 21st century citizen/student is one that is entering into a highly globalized society.  To become more familiar with their global peers, this course is designed bring an awareness to students of the major world religions. It will examine the history, teachings, practices, and key leaders of a selection of religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. This World Religions course teaches students how to knowledgably and caringly interact in our diverse world.

Students in this course will:

  • Name and classify the major religions of the world.
  • Identify and explain the history of the world’s major religions.
  • Compare the differing beliefs of the world’s religions.
  • Name the leaders of these religions and the impact they made on it.

 


 CURRENT ISSUES

Raising one’s awareness of global issues is increasingly important as the people and places of the world become more interdependent.  At the same time, consuming news with a critical eye is vital to our way of life and to defeating narrow-
mindedness.  In this course we will take a closer look at what’s going on here and around the world so that we can be more informed and, ultimately, in a better position to solve many of the challenges that we face today.

 

 

 

Students in this course will:

 
  • Gain a deeper understanding of local, regional, national, and international issues through critical-thinking, group activities, and classroom discussions.
  • Create a journal of significant news events from multiple media sources.
  • Choose a topic of interest and create an in-depth project to highlight the causes, effects, and possible solutions to that issue.

 


ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE

This course focuses on the study of human society, the relationships created among members of society, and the political and economic systems at work together.  Students in this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding both economics and political science.  Economic principles will be taught within the context of political systems. 

Students in this course will:

  • Identify both principles of a federal government and economics.
  • Analyze political ideologies and political parties while comparing free versus mixed markets and the difference between private ownership and government control of resources.
  • Compare the governmental and economic policies of socialism, communism, capitalism and democracy.
  • ExploreU.S.domestic policy along with elasticity, taxation, subsidies, GDP, GNP, healthcare, welfare, etc.
  • DiscussU.S.foreign policy along with foreign trade agreements, terms of trade, world versus domestic price, globalization, outsourcing, etc.
  • Measure the influence of government policies on the economy.
  • Examine state and local government issues.
  • Use economic tools to evaluate government policies.

 

*AP Microeconomics may be taken in place of this course.


 

GOVERNMENT AND CITIZENSHP

The purpose of this course is to provide students with relevant information about our government so that they can be active and well-informed participants in the political process.

Students will investigate the historical and philosophical foundations of American Government. 

Students in this course will:

  • Identify and critique the functions and goals of our government, as well the purpose and structure of our Constitution.
  • Understand the role of citizens in a democracy, including voting rights and responsibilities, the way we choose candidates, and the way citizens and politicians are influenced.
  • Analyze the Bill of Rights and court decisions to above understand our civil liberties and civil rights.

 

*College Democracy In A Changing World may be taken in place of this course.

 


 

 PSYCHOLOGY

The purpose of this psychology course is to introduce students to the scientific study of the mind and human behavior.  Psychology attempts to identify biological, social, and environmental factors in order to describe, explain, predict, and change behavior.

 

Students in this course will:

  • Study the historical and contemporary psychological perspectives.
  • Examine how psychologists conduct research.
  • Learn about the various states of consciousness.
  • Analyze how we learn, how we remember, and why we forget.
  • Explore personality theories and assessments.
  • Discuss psychological disorders and therapy.
  • Explore research involving social interaction, including prejudice, conformity, and attraction.

 


 

 SOCIOLOGY

The purpose of this Sociology course is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of human social behavior and the structure of human interaction.

 

Students in this course will:

  • Examine how social scientists conduct research and conduct their own original research.
  • Identify and analyze the components of a culture.
  • Understand the human socialization process.
  • Examine deviance in society.
  • Explore inequalities in race, ethnicity, and class.
  • Investigate issues related to social justice and human rights.

 


 

¨ADVANCED PLACEMENT OFFERINGS ¨

 

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY SPLIT

This is a full year course.

Note:  AP Human Geography rotates every other day with Physical Education 9.  Students registered for AP Human Geography must also take 9th Grade Physical Education using course number 8716.

This course may be taken instead of Human Geography. 

This course is designed to challenge the needs of highly motivated and capable students in the subject area of Human Geography.  Successful students will be those who are ambitious, responsible, and diligent in completing homework and meet the following criteria:

  • Has a grade of B or higher in 8th grade Global Studies and Language Arts.
  • 85% or higher on the 8th grade reading MAP OR Reading portion of EXPLORE OR  7th grade reading MCA.

 

[Fees:  This course may have associated fees.]

 

AP Human Geography is designed to introduce students to the study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and altercation of Earth’s surface.  Students will use spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences.  They will also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.  This challenging course is the equivalent of a freshman college course and students may earn college credit.

Students in this course will:

  • Use and think about maps and spatial data.
  • Understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places.
  • Recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes.
  • Define regions and evaluate the regionalization process.
  • Characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places.

 

Preparation for the AP exam requires an intense time schedule and significant outside work will be required.  Students must pass the AP exam to earn college credit.

 


 

AP WORLD HISTORY SEQUENCE

This course may be taken in place of World History 1 and 2. 

This is a full year course.
This course has been developed to challenge highly motivated and capable students in the area of World History.  This course covers the same learner outcomes as World History in greater depth and at a faster pace.  Students utilize a high level of critical thinking skills and read and write extensively.  A significant amount of outside work is required including a summer assignment.  This course is a challenging course meant to be the equivalent of a freshman college course.

The AP World History curriculum begins in 8000 BCE and continues to the present day.  The time periods are grouped into five major units, and highlight the following themes:

  • Interaction between humans and the environment.
  • Development and interaction of cultures.
  • State-building, expansion, and conflict.
  • Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems.
  • Development and transformation of social structures.

Students in this course will:

  • Construct and evaluate arguments, using evidence to make plausible arguments.
  • Use documents and other primary data; developing the skills necessary to analyze point of view.
  • Assess continuity and change over time and over different world regions.
  • Explore diversity of interpretations through analysis of context.
  • Read and write extensively.

 

Preparation for the AP Exam requires an intense time schedule and significant outside work will be required.  Students must pass the AP Exam to earn college credit.


AP UNITED STATES HISTORY SEQUENCE

This course may be taken in place of United States History 1 and 2.

This is a full year course.

 

This course is a challenging course meant to be the equivalent of a freshman college course and may earn college credit.  It is a full year survey of US history from the age of exploration and discovery to the present (1491-present).  Solid reading and writing skills, along with the willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed.  Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents, and methods of historical scholarship.

Students in this course will:

  • Develop an appreciation for the study of history.
  • Develop an appreciation for and understanding of the process of historical inquiry.
  • Develop a better understanding of the history of theUnited States– in political, economic, social and cultural terms.
  • Develop a better understanding of the great issues that are at the hearts of United States history.
  • Improve writing, research and critical reading skills.
  • Improve thinking skills – specifically to develop ability to analyze historical arguments.

 

Preparation for the AP exam requires an intense time schedule and significant outside work will be required.  Students must pass the AP exam to earn college credit.

 


 

 AP MICROECONOMICS

This is a one semester class recommended for any student who wishes to take on the challenge of an AP course.  Microeconomics is often described as the science of studying, measuring, and predicting human behavior.  Emphasis is placed on logical, critical, and evaluative thinking skills while analyzing both consumers and producers in our economy.  Strong reading, basic math skills, and a willingness to work are requirements for this course.  Students will have the opportunity to earn college credit for this class.

 

Students in this course will:

  • Develop an understanding of basic economic concepts.
  • Explore and analyze the nature and functions of product markets.
  • Improve thinking skills – specifically towards factor markets.
  • Develop an understanding of the role efficiency and equity play in economic policies.
  • Analyze and evaluate the government’s role in the economy.

 

Preparation for the AP exam requires an intense time schedule and significant outside work will be required.  Students must pass the AP exam to earn college credit.

 


 

 AP MICRO/MACRO ECONOMICS

 

AP Micro/Macro is a college level, full year course designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics. AP Micro/Macro will emphasize the study of national income, economic performance measures, economic growth and international economics. The aim of AP Micro/Macro is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in a typical college introduction level economics course.  Students will learn to think like economists – to question, to evaluate marginal costs and marginal benefits, to explore the many ways that one action will cause secondary actions. 

This course will be split into 2 areas of focus in order to best prepare students for the AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics exams in May.  The textbook provides students with a comprehensive breakdown of concepts and corresponding percentages of those concepts that they can expect to see on each individual AP exam.

 

Students in this course will:

  • Develop an understanding of basic economic concepts.
  • Explore and analyze the nature and functions of product markets.
  • Improve thinking skills – specifically towards factor markets.
  • Develop an understanding of the role efficiency and equity play in economic policies.
  • Analyze the trends and projections of national income
  • Develop an understanding of economic growth and international globalization
  • Analyze and evaluate the government’s role in the economy.
  • Think like an economist

Preparation for AP exams requires an intense time schedule and significant outside work will be required.  Students must pass each AP exams to earn college credit for that course.

 


 

 AP PSYCHOLOGY

The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the mind and human behavior.  Psychology attempts to identify biological, social and environmental factors in order to describe, explain, predict, and change behavior.

 

Students in this course will:

  • Understand the historical and contemporary perspectives.
  • Examine the methods psychologists use in their science and practice.
  • Explore the brain and nervous system impact on behavior and mental processes.
  • Analyze major theories of sensation, perception, learning, memory, motivation and emotion.
  • Explore the life span of human development.
  • Examine the development of personality.
  • Develop an understanding of social interaction, including conformity, prejudice, and attraction.
  • Analyze psychological disorders and current treatment methods.

 

Preparation for the AP exam requires an intense time schedule and significant outside work will be required.  Students must pass the AP exam to earn college credit.